• Guidelines for Non-Disabled Writers - Just republishing this for future reference. First published in Literary Hub, August 23, 2016 Recently I have read several articles about disabled...
  • Living Fiction, Storybook Lives - As individuals and societies we are shaped by story: our culture and sense of self literally cannot exist without it because we only know who and what we are when we can tell a story about ourselves. We learn how to tell our story by listening to the tales that are out there and picking through them, choosing some details and discarding others.
  • My Story, Mystery: A Letter to Hild of Whitby - "You were magnificent, I think, but hidden: a black hole at the heart of history. We can trace you only by your gravitational pull." This essay first appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, September 2015.
  • The Women You Didn’t See: A Letter to Alice Sheldon - "You were brilliant, I think, but consumed by the inevitability of the abattoir. In your fiction all the gates are closed; characters are funnelled down a chute to flashing knives." Epistolatory criticism first published 2015.
  • Disability: Art, Scholarship, and Activism - On Friday May 13 I gave a presentation at the University of Washington’s Pacific & Western Disability Symposium. The theme of this...
  • Writing Slow River - Is there such a thing as an "essential self"? If so, can it be warped, encouraged, or destroyed? How far outside the moral and physical boundaries of that essential self would I we be willing to step in order to stay alive? And—if we stepped so far out that we became someone we did not recognise or like—would we still be us? I wrote Slow River to answer those questions.
  • Writing from the Body - Art and the Body are huge subjects with all kinds of branches and nooks and crannies. In what follows I poke around in those topics that interest me—the philosophy of dualism, cyberspace as nirvana, the concept of genius, the religious right—and see which pieces connect along the way.
  • As We Mean to Go On - An essay about how Nicola Griffith and Kelley Eskridge met at a writing workshop and how books and the written word made their love possible.
  • Leigh Brackett’s The Long Tomorrow - I read Brackett's The Long Tomorrow for the first time in 2005. Five pages in, I wondered why I'd never heard of this novel. Twenty pages later, I was wondering why it wasn't universally acknowledged as the first Great American SF Novel.
  • Doing the Work - Aud is my commitment to excellence made flesh/word and walking around; she uses whatever it takes to get the job done. She is the tension between the joy and discipline that is my art (or craft or life or bane, depending) filed to a point and stabbed into the tabletop.